Third Time’s the Charm

I got vaccinated in the early spring. I didn’t write about it because up until that time, reading about anyone getting vaccinated was very “triggering” for me. I didn’t want anyone not eligible or unable to find a vaccination to read about me and experience that sense of anger, frustration and helplessness that I was feeling (am still feeling). As someone who doesn’t like to be a victim, this whole pandemic has been maddening. Being at the mercy of others doesn’t sit well with me.

Washington had opened up the phases in which folks over 65, some essential workers, then over 55 with 3 preexisting conditions (which I wrote about in my January post) could schedule vaccinations, but people on immunosuppressants due to medical conditions or disease treatment sat like sitting ducks. I waited my turn as I read reports of people not in phase getting shots. I am lucky enough to be able to work from home, so I knew I had it better than many. Post after post on Instagram showed happy faces with vaccine cards; people that were definitely not 55 with preexisting conditions. I heard from people who lied on their eligibility paperwork. I went into the pharmacy to pick up the one prescription I hadn’t turned in to mail order and stood in line behind people waiting for their vaccine. It was so close.. Yet so far away.

I became a “vaccine chaser” in my town, calling and asking every clinic and pharmacy to get on extras lists. Finally I found a small clinic that I’d never even heard of and got on their list. A staff person called me the next day and set up a time for my husband and me to come in, as someone had canceled that day. I got off the phone and cried with relief. 

Even wearing a mask at his day camp, my four year old son got sick two weeks ago. My heart was in my stomach when I took him through the backdoor of his pediatrician’s office to get tested for COVID-19. I had an eye appointment that Friday and I had to know if I could go or not. We found out in less than 24 hours that the test was negative. I know it will happen again. He slept in my bed with a bad cold for three nights (if you’re a mom., you know) and all I got was a nasty sore throat. I was pretty darn proud of my immune system. But, I work hard at it (vitamins, water, sleep, exercise). I do all the right things; I have no choice if I want to keep my vision.

Studies have shown that those on immunosuppressants aren’t necessarily making the antibodies when they receive the vaccine. The CDC says that a large number of hospitalized “break through” cases are actually immunocompromised people who didn’t make antibodies or enough antibodies.

So, I got a third shot last week; my third Moderna vaccination. The guy at the counter asked me if I qualified in a tone that didn’t surprise me. Looks can be deceiving and uveitis certainly is never listed as a disease for which patient would be taking immunosuppressants. Have you had a liver transplant? Do you have cancer? No, but I take or have taken many of the same medications; dosage has depended on severity at the time.

The pharmacist who administered the vaccine, however, was great. We had a conversation about uveitis, the medication I’m taking (prednisone, CellCept, Humira) and that I’d discussed the booster with my doctor. 

It’s not even necessarily about me getting sick now though; with three vaccines in me, I’m fairly certain I wouldn’t get critically ill from COVID and have a much better chance of being able to stay on my medication. What worries me is being contagious and not being able to attend my appointment every 6 weeks at which my doctor gives me an Avastin injection to keep my CNV at bay. 

If you’re like me, you don’t have the luxury of debating what it is that is being injected into your body at all times. And unless you grow your own food and drink, make your own cosmetics, toiletries, and cleaners, take no medication and would refuse an IV if you are hospitalized, you actually don’t know what your body is taking on either. So far, I have had zero side effects from receiving the Moderna vaccine three times over. But, if I end up growing a third eye, you know I’ll have use for it.


Sources and Suggested Reading:

6 Things To Know If You’re Immunocompromised And Considering A 3rd Shot

CDC Website: COVID-19 Vaccines for Moderately to Severely Immunocompromised People

Three Doses of an mRNA Covid-19 Vaccine in Solid-Organ Transplant Recipients

Antibodies aren’t everything: Scientists say COVID-19 booster shots aren’t needed yet—here’s why

More COVID-19 related articles are linked on my homepage

One thought on “Third Time’s the Charm

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s